STAMP Launch ‘My Mental Health Passport’

At a time when young people’s mental health and wellbeing is regularly top on the agenda, Chilypep, have designed a secure website to help young people track their mental health in their own words. 

The STAMP (Support, Think, Act, Motivate, Participate) group designed the digital mental health passport to help with transitions from service to service. These upheavals can often be difficult and challenging – especially when someone is living with a mental health problem.  Young people have said that meeting new people and having to repeat a sensitive story can be distressing – they loose track of who knows what, and what they’ve said.

Transitions is recognised as a big issue for young people and mental health services are constantly looking for ways to help young people navigate the complicated move from children to adult services. Sheffield CCG managed to secure a small pot of funding from NHS England to develop this website.

The ‘My Mental Health Passport’ website is a free space where young people can describe their experiences, preferences, emotions and feelings in a confidential environment. It’s been designed by young people for young people, so they can have more control over their information and their own stories. They’ve also added an emoji journal so young people can keep a track on mood or experiences between appointments to give a truer reflection of how they have been over the course of a week or a month.

When, where and how young people share their personal information in the passport is up to them- but it will hopefully help them manage difficult conversations with professionals.

The website also includes a ‘Help and Advice’ section, with a list of other websites that can offer help and advice, even if your not logged in.

We would appreciate your help in spreading the news about ‘My Mental Health Passport’ in whatever way you can. You can visit the website at www.mymhp.org.uk

Mental Health Apps: What do young people think?

Mental Health apps are increasingly being used by young people as an extra form of support.

For young people struggling with mental health there’s a new form of support becoming widely available. Not a therapist in a doctors office or a traditional service, this type of support comes from their smart phone and can be reached anywhere there is an internet connection.

2018 has seen an increase in the number of apps available aimed at young people to help support their mental health and emotional wellbeing.

A rise in young people experiencing ill mental health along with severe cuts to services which would traditionally support them has lead to in increase in the number of apps available as well as the number of those downloading and using them. But are they a suitable substitute for traditional support? Which apps should young people use? Where can they find them?

Chilypep spoke to the young people we work with in Barnsley, aged between 15 and 19, to find out what young people really think about this digital support network and found mixed feelings and opinions.

“I think it’s good thatyoung people are turning to self-help methods. It’s easier to access support and self-help on phones and apps especially out of hours.” Said one young person.

Another young person commented “It’s good that we can get some help at anytime through the use of apps but it’s bad that we can’t get that help in person.”

When asked whether the young people found the apps personally helpful one young person said: “Sometimes but not when I’m at crisis point, you need to be calm enough to be rational and able to concentrate to use and understand the apps.” Another said: “I use them as they can give good advice but aren’t always helpful.”

The young people said that some of the most commonly used apps they has personal experience with were Alive, Safety Plan, WYSA, and Calm Harm.

Chilypep have been working with young people in Barnsley with funding from Barnsley Clinical Commissioning Group to develop resources for young people experiencing ill mental health.

This includes the groundbreaking Youth Mental Health First Aid Kit which launched in October 2017 and the Open Up Barnsley Directory or mental health services. This includes a guide to young people mental health friendly apps and websites. You can find the Open Up Barnsley Directory here.